iwantmyfairytalending:

mulatoomcmxci:

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

babybutta:

yarrahs-life:

high-power-prolific:

thehereticpharaoh:

People really don’t believe Ancient Egyptians were ethnically African?

They referred to themselves, not as ”Egyptians” (a Greek term) , but as ”Kemmui’’, meaning, ”the blacks”.
The country itself they called, Kemet, or black nation.
'Kem' is the term for black in the ancient Egyptian language. It is represented in hieroglyphs by a stick charred at both ends.”
"km.t, the name of Ancient Egypt in Egyptian; Egypt (Coptic: Kemi)
r n km.t, the native term for the Egyptian language
(Ref: The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vols 1&2, E.A. Budge, Dover.) 
Note: words inside brackets are the determinatives or word classifiers along with their English meanings.
Kem, kame, kmi, kmem, kmom = to be black 
Kememu = Black people (Ancient Egyptians) in both Ancient and modern Egyptian (Kmemou).
Kem [khet][wood] = extremely black, jet-black
Kemet = any black thing. Note: “t” is silent - pronounced Kemé
Kemet [nu][community, settlement, nation] = Black nation = Ancient Egypt.  
Kemet [Romé][people] = Black people. Ancient Egyptians. 
Kemit [Shoit][books] = Black books, Ancient Egyptian literature.  
Kem wer [miri][large body of water] = The Great Black sea (The Red sea). This sea is neither black nor red, this is in reference to which nation, Black or Red, at a particular time, controlled this body of water. 
Kemi fer = Black double house; seat of government. Note: by reference to Wolof again, we know that to make a plural of per or house, the “p” becomes an “f” or fer. Thus fero=great houses (double), it is not pero as Budge writes.
In Ancient Egyptian, the ordinary adjective always follows the noun it modifies, whereas a sanctified adjective usually comes before its noun.  The sanctified adjectives are:
Kem —  Black
Suten -  Royal
Nter —-  Holy, Sacred
Examples:
Kem ti = Black image, sacred image : ti oubash = white image  
Kem ho = Black face/title of a god   : ho oubash = white face  
Kem ta = Black land, holy land        : Ta deshret = Red land (also; Ta Sett) 
This rule does not apply when Black is used as a noun-adjective of nationality:  
Hompt Kemet = copper of Black; Egyptian copper :  Hompt Sett = copper of the Red nations; Asiatic copper  
Ro in Kemet (page 416a) = speech of Black; mute ro n Kemet = word of the mouth of Black; the Egyptian language
Kemet Deshret = Black and Red; good and evil; fertile and barren, etc.; Duality  
Deshretu (page 554a,b) = red ones, red devils.  Used also to refer to the Namu and Tamhu; not a complimentary label. 
African Origins: 
The following Ancient Egyptian words acknowledge the origins of Pharaonic Egyptian civilization; 
Khentu Hon Nefer (page 554a) = founders of the Excellent Order. Budge: “peoples and tribes of Nubia and the Egyptian Sudan.” For “Hon” see page 586b. 
Hon Nefer (page 1024b) = Excellent Order
Kenus (page1024b) = mighty; brave (from Kenu, page 772a)
Ta Khent (page 1051b/page 554b) = land of the beginning.  
Eau (page 952b/page 17b) = the old country  
Ancient Egyptian’s Worldview:  
The Egyptian’s view of the world was the exact opposite of the current Western one. To the Egyptian, the top of the world was in the south (upper) towards the African interior, the bottom (lower) towards the north, hence upper and lower Egypt; upper and lower Syria.”
"Oh yes, the black soil business.
Most scholars outside the modern western cover-up establishment have rejected the false interpretation some have given to Kemet, ostensibly alluding the term Kemet to the alleged ”black soil”  of Egypt. There’s nothing in the term, outside the imagination of western myth-makers,  to suggest the Egyptians referred to the color of the soil or sand, rather than the people, in naming their country. Our position is consistent with the testimony of the ancient Greek writers, eyewitnesses who unanimously described the Egyptians as a black people, closely related to the ”Ethiopians”.”

And white Hollywood casts white actors and gives them tans.

*internal sobbing*

i will never not reblog this. i know too many people who for real dont think Egypt is a part of Africa.

KNOW YOUR HISTORY

KNOW YOUR GEOGRAPHY

iwantmyfairytalending:

mulatoomcmxci:

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

babybutta:

yarrahs-life:

high-power-prolific:

thehereticpharaoh:

People really don’t believe Ancient Egyptians were ethnically African?

They referred to themselves, not as ”Egyptians” (a Greek term) , but as ”Kemmui’’, meaning, ”the blacks”.

The country itself they called, Kemet, or black nation.

'Kem' is the term for black in the ancient Egyptian language. It is represented in hieroglyphs by a stick charred at both ends.”

"km.t, the name of Ancient Egypt in Egyptian; Egypt (Coptic: Kemi)

r n km.t, the native term for the Egyptian language

(Ref: The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vols 1&2, E.A. Budge, Dover.) 

Note: words inside brackets are the determinatives or word classifiers along with their English meanings.

Kem, kame, kmi, kmem, kmom = to be black 

Kememu = Black people (Ancient Egyptians) in both Ancient and modern Egyptian (Kmemou).

Kem [khet][wood] = extremely black, jet-black

Kemet = any black thing. Note: “t” is silent - pronounced Kemé

Kemet [nu][community, settlement, nation] = Black nation = Ancient Egypt.  

Kemet [Romé][people] = Black people. Ancient Egyptians. 

Kemit [Shoit][books] = Black books, Ancient Egyptian literature.  

Kem wer [miri][large body of water] = The Great Black sea (The Red sea). This sea is neither black nor red, this is in reference to which nation, Black or Red, at a particular time, controlled this body of water. 

Kemi fer = Black double house; seat of government. Note: by reference to Wolof again, we know that to make a plural of per or house, the “p” becomes an “f” or fer. Thus fero=great houses (double), it is not pero as Budge writes.

In Ancient Egyptian, the ordinary adjective always follows the noun it modifies, whereas a sanctified adjective usually comes before its noun.  The sanctified adjectives are:

Kem —  Black

Suten -  Royal

Nter —-  Holy, Sacred

Examples:

Kem ti = Black image, sacred image : ti oubash = white image  

Kem ho = Black face/title of a god   : ho oubash = white face  

Kem ta = Black land, holy land        : Ta deshret = Red land (also; Ta Sett) 

This rule does not apply when Black is used as a noun-adjective of nationality:  

Hompt Kemet = copper of Black; Egyptian copper :  Hompt Sett = copper of the Red nations; Asiatic copper  

Ro in Kemet (page 416a) = speech of Black; mute ro n Kemet = word of the mouth of Black; the Egyptian language

Kemet Deshret = Black and Red; good and evil; fertile and barren, etc.; Duality  

Deshretu (page 554a,b) = red ones, red devils.  Used also to refer to the Namu and Tamhu; not a complimentary label. 

African Origins: 

The following Ancient Egyptian words acknowledge the origins of Pharaonic Egyptian civilization; 

Khentu Hon Nefer (page 554a) = founders of the Excellent Order. Budge: “peoples and tribes of Nubia and the Egyptian Sudan.” For “Hon” see page 586b. 

Hon Nefer (page 1024b) = Excellent Order

Kenus (page1024b) = mighty; brave (from Kenu, page 772a)

Ta Khent (page 1051b/page 554b) = land of the beginning.  

Eau (page 952b/page 17b) = the old country  

Ancient Egyptian’s Worldview:  

The Egyptian’s view of the world was the exact opposite of the current Western one. To the Egyptian, the top of the world was in the south (upper) towards the African interior, the bottom (lower) towards the north, hence upper and lower Egypt; upper and lower Syria.”

"Oh yes, the black soil business.

Most scholars outside the modern western cover-up establishment have rejected the false interpretation some have given to Kemet, ostensibly alluding the term Kemet to the alleged ”black soil”  of Egypt. There’s nothing in the term, outside the imagination of western myth-makers,  to suggest the Egyptians referred to the color of the soil or sand, rather than the people, in naming their country. Our position is consistent with the testimony of the ancient Greek writers, eyewitnesses who unanimously described the Egyptians as a black people, closely related to the ”Ethiopians”.”

And white Hollywood casts white actors and gives them tans.

*internal sobbing*

i will never not reblog this. i know too many people who for real dont think Egypt is a part of Africa.

KNOW YOUR HISTORY

KNOW YOUR GEOGRAPHY

(via niam-is-real)

hedgehog-goulash7:

letsgetdowney:

gearsinthephoenix:

No, but you don’t understand why I liked Iron Man 3 so much.

In all the other Avengers movies, we see characters going through pain and trauma and heartache.  We see Steve lose practically his whole world and still carry on.  We watch Bruce struggle with trying to figure out just how the Hulk fits into his life and his psyche; it is implied that he deals with depression and tries to end his life.  We hear Clint and Natasha and their angst about the “red in their ledgers”, the things they have done, and we watch as Thor essentially comes of age and deals with the pain of having his brother fall down deeper and deeper.  We KNOW the pain and the issues and the upset are there.

But Iron Man 3 is the first time we actually get to witness—REALLY witness—the aftermath of heroics.

In the first part of the movie we see Tony Stark dealing with real, honest-to-god PTSD.  He has panic attacks, he can’t sleep, he gets reckless and has a harder time taking care of himself, he obsessively spends hours working on suits so he can protect Pepper—even though in doing so he is unintentionally threatening their relationship. Rarely has such a thorough job been done in showing that all the flash-bang-let’s-save-the-world action would, in real life, have some serious psychological consequences.

Then, as the film progresses, we see him laid low.  REALLY low—we see him get taken apart piece by piece.  He loses his home, he loses contact with the people he cares about, he loses his suit—which means, in the context of the past few films, that he is in some ways dead.  “He is Iron Man”, after all, isn’t he?  The public sees him as one with the suit, and in a sense, so does he—a good deal of his self esteem, his sense of being able to defend people, is locked up in what he can do in the suit.  And now he’s stranded in the middle of nowhere—he can’t fly, he can’t fight much, he’s still suffering from PTSD, he’s being actively hunted by the few people who don’t think he’s dead.  All of his real ability is locked up in his brain, a place not everyone would think to look.  We see him almost completely broken down.

And then we watch him build himself back up again, but with one major difference: he does it without the suit.

In most of the second half of the film, in almost all of his major victories, Tony is not in the suit.  He breaks into Killian’s mansion essentially with odds and ends he’s cobbled together.  He saves the passengers from Air Force One with a suit he’s remotely controlling.  He wins the final battle with a whole bunch of suits that he is not in at all.  Rhodes saves the president, and Pepper kills the villain.  Not Tony.  And at the end of the day he blows up all the suits and tosses his mini arc reactor into the ocean.

Iron Man 3 is brilliant and underrated precisely because it lets the hero be a real man—a man, not a man in a suit.  A person who can still work wonders even when he’s at his very lowest, when he’s stranded and battling mental illness.  Someone who can’t operate completely alone, who lets other people have some victories as well—heck, who needs his friends and teammates to win.  And as he says at the end of the movie, while he may not always wear a suit, he will always be Iron Man. 

And personally, I think that is an A-freaking-plus storyline to bring into this franchise.

THANK YOU AND BLESS THIS POST

THIS. 

Thank you.  What I’ve been trying to tell people since IM3 was released.

(via rockpapersonic)

acciolove12:

teacupwarrior:

Imagine that at the end of Dumbledore’s speech at the beginning of the year, he asks if there are any questions, and one first year muggleborn kid raises his hand, whips out a smart phone and asks for the wifi password.

And then Dumbledore just casually says “Sherbet lemon, with a capital S”, and commences the feast like it’s no big deal while the non-muggleborns think WIFI is some sort of secret society.

OMFG

(via sleepwalkerindreamersclothing)

edens-blog:

beben-eleben:

Jim Dingilian proves that a creative and skillful artist can create works of art with just about anything. By coating the interior of empty glass bottles with black smoke and then carefully brushing it away with tools mounted on dowels, he creates detailed and beautiful but dark works of smoke art that are dripping with a sense of suburban decay (via Bored Panda).

(via angryladies)

Tags: art

cedricfindsthatamusing:

epikalia:

remyreaper:

THOR YOU PRECIOUS FIVE YEAR OLD

reblogging for that accurate commentary.

lookit not-so-secret fangirl!tony. little bug.

(Source: ironfries, via mitchellhp)

iampunkassbetch:

This is so fucking cute

(Source: daddyslittleprop, via benalishes)

jqqqq:

i suppose you could say seymour did it…… for the vine

image

(via longlivenightvale)

Tags: oh my god